Fidget Spinner Contour

There is an actual homosapien who uses a fidget spinner to apply his contour. No, I’m not joking! If you thought the world had well and truly lost it at boiled egg beauty blenders, there was some of ‘it’ found, apparently.

Look, I’m all for technology and wearable technology, but I do think this is a bit stupendous… Firstly, the fidget spinner spins on surfaces. Surfaces always have germs and bacteria. I may not be the most hygienic person in the world, but I’d never place my makeup brush on a kitchen counter or desk before applying make-up with it. Gross. This fidget spinner has also been touched by other people, I’m assuming? Grosser.

As lovely as James Charles‘ makeup is, I won’t get on board with the: ‘Fidget Spinner used to contour’ thing. Watch his tutorial below:

What are ‘Fidget Spinners’?

Fidget Spinners are cool gadgets that, in my opinion, are becoming overrated.

They were originally created to help children with autism cope with stress, but have since been used widely across the world…

According to reports, the lady who invented them hasn’t received any revenue from the idea because she struggled to afford patenting the idea in the early days (2005), when it wasn’t popular… However,  Catherine Hettinger (the inventor) has since spoken out, saying she’s “pleased about its popularity.

Well, there you go! A bit of factual information about Fidget spinner… That said, I still can’t find the bit where it says “they were designed as beauty tools to help with contour”, can you?